Gender Pay Gap Is Non-Existent And The Myth Should Be Dispelled

Gender pay gap in USA

Since decades, feminists have been oppressing women to join the workforce who were otherwise very happy in the comfort, peace, and security of their homes. Feminists have taken away women’s choice of work inside or outside the home through systematic and strategic brainwashing. Still not satisfied, the modus operandi of feminists came into full effect as they managed to convince women that they were being paid less for the same amount of work as men.

President Barack Obama adds fuel to the already biased agenda of feminists, citing that women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns, ignoring the fact that women take courses in colleges and universities which pay less, take time off during pregnancy, get into professionals which are relatively easier than those of men, and work less number of hours than men, among other things.

“Today women make up about half our workforce. But they still make 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. That is wrong, and in 2014, it’s an embarrassment.” – U.S. President Barack Obama


About Mohammad Yusha

www.purushatma.wordpress.com

2 Responses to Gender Pay Gap Is Non-Existent And The Myth Should Be Dispelled

  1. Mohammad Yusha April 22, 2015 at 6:08 pm #

    Why a female boss refuses to hire women – Must Read!

    I don’t want to hire any more women.

    Yes, I said it. You cringed when you read it and I cringed when I wrote it, and even more so when the thought first occurred to me. I am a woman, a feminist, a mother, and a passionate entrepreneur. I don’t just stand for equality – I have crashed the glass ceiling in every aspect of my life. I get extremely angry when I come across articles that insist there are gender differences that extend beyond physiology. I am fortunate to have had female role models who taught me through their own examples that I can accomplish absolutely anything I desire.

    Over the years, I have hired outstanding women – educated, intelligent and highly articulate. Yet, I am exhausted. I have become profoundly tired of being a therapist and a babysitter, of being drawn into passive-aggressive mental games and into constantly questioning my own worth as a manager. I have had several women who quit to stay home to “figure out what to do next”. No, not to stay home and care for children, but to mooch of a husband or a boyfriend while soul searching (aka: taking a language class or learning a new inapplicable skill that could be acquired after work). Incidentally, I have not had a single male employee quit with no plan in mind.

    I have had women cry in team meetings, come to my office to ask me if I still like them and create melodrama over the side of the office their desk was being placed. I am simply incapable of verbalizing enough appreciation to female employees to satiate their need for it for at least a week’s worth of work. Here is one example to explain. My receptionist was resigning and, while in tears, she told me that although she was passionate about our brand and loved the job, she could not overcome the fact that I did not thank her for her work. It really made me stop in my tracks and so I asked for an example. “Remember when I bought the pictures with butterflies to hang in the front? And you just came and said ‘thank you’? That is a perfect example!” – “Wait”, I said, “So, I did thank you then?” – “Yes! But you did not elaborate on what exactly you liked about them! Why didn’t you?” She had bought them with the company credit card and I actually did not like them at all, but I digress.

    I have developed a different approach for offering constructive criticism to male and female employees. When I have something to say to one of the men, I just say it! I don’t think it through – I simply spit it out, we have a brief discussion and we move on. They even frequently thank me for the feedback! Not so fast with my female staff. I plan, I prepare, I think, I run it through my business partner and then I think again. I start with a lot of positive feedback before I feel that I have cushioned my one small negative comment sufficiently, yet it is rarely enough. We talk forever, dissect every little piece of it, and then come back to the topic time and time again in the future. And I also have to confirm that I still like them – again and again, and again.

    I am also yet to have a single male employee come to my office to give me dirt on a co-worker or share an awkward gossip-like story. My female employees though? Every. single. one.

    When I opened my company, I was excited for many reasons. One of them was wanting to make it an amazing place for women to build their careers. After all, we were two women, both mothers with very small children, opening a company in a very competitive industry. I was going to celebrate the achievements of my female hires, encourage them to find their voices, celebrate their pregnancies and year-long maternity leaves, be understanding and accommodating when they would have to juggle work/daycare/school schedules. Yet, I had no idea that the problems women faced in their workplace were often far removed from the typical inequalities feminism continues to address. It is not men who sabotage women and stump their career growth – it is women themselves!

    Article taken from Clarissa’s blog

  2. Babar February 26, 2015 at 3:33 pm #

    People are paid according to their ability, talent, work ethics, qualifications and job experience. No two people, even two men or two women, are paid the same, so down goes the myth. Females are known to take more time off, especially maternity, and many work as teachers, then they have the audacity to compare their pay with men who have toiled for years for their PhD. Men also work the most dangerous jobs in the world, so obviously they will be paid more. If women are going to choose easier fields, they should not be the ones complaining.

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